Companion Animals Act

Companion Animals Act
Puppies at home
You have legal responsibilities if you want to have a pet in your home. Companion Animals Act Australia has one of the highest rates of pet ownership in the world. Whilst most owners love and cherish their pets, a small few let them down. There is legislation in place.  
Puppies at home

We love our pets in Australia, and Canterbury-Bankstown is no exception – most of us love and treat our pets like members of the family! There are, however, a small number of people who do not care for their animals responsibly, and these animals often become a problem for the community.

The Companion Animals Act, which first came into effect in September 1998, is designed to benefit pets, their owners and the wider community.

Under the Act, you have responsibilities if you want to have a pet in your home. These include a permanent identification and lifetime registration system, which greatly assists authorities in returning lost and injured animals to their owners. 

Under the Act, cats are considered to have no boundaries and are free to roam. Due to this, councils are only able to seize stray cats if they are in a public place prohibited under the Act (i.e food preparation/consumption area or wildlife protection area), or it is necessary for the protection of a person or animal from injury or death. If those circumstances apply, Council provides residents with cat traps to place in their yard for a $100 refundable deposit.  The hirer is required to regularly check the trap, and should an animal be caught, contact Council for arrangements to have the cat transported to Council’s pound. Trapped cats that are microchipped and registered will, in most cases, be returned to their owner.
 
In circumstances where the health and welfare of an animal is the issue, the most appropriate authority to contact is the RSPCA.

You can click here to read the Comp​anion Animals Act in full. ​