Domestic Violence Toolkit

Domestic Violence Toolkit
Photo of a family entering home
If we as a community want to stop domestic violence,
then we as employers need to step up and take
a stand. Domestic and family violence is not a
private matter. Domestic Violence Toolkit If we as a community want to stop domestic violence, Business Support; Business; Domestic Violence
Photo of a family entering home

​What is domestic and family violence?

Domestic violence refers to acts of violence that occur between people who have, or have had, a domestic relationship. While there is no single definition, the central element of domestic violence is an ongoing pattern of behaviour that is aimed at controlling a partner through fear - for example, by using violent and threatening behaviour. (Domestic violence is defined in the Crimes (Domestic and Personal Violence) Act 2007.)

Family violence is a more inclusive term and refers to violence between family members, as well as violence between intimate partners, and involves the same types of behaviours as described for domestic violence.

Domestic and family violence can take many forms and includes physical, verbal, emotional, psychological, financial and sexual abuse.

Domestic and family violence in the workplace

Domestic and family violence is not confined to the home. It can follow the person to work and affect, not only the individual, but also their colleagues. This is especially true when a person leaves a violent home situation and the workplace is a known location where the abuser can find the individual.

Domestic violence does not discriminate. It can affect anyone regardless of age, race, religion, income level, gender, sexual orientation, or cultural or ethnic background. It can impact team members at every level of the organisation.

According to the Australian Bureau of Statistics, approximately one in four women (23 per cent or 2.2 million) have experienced violence by an intimate partner. It is estimated that one woman dies each week across Australia at the hands of a partner. Significantly, almost two thirds of all women who experience domestic violence are engaged in the workforce.

If we as a community want to stop this violence, then we as employers need to step up and take a stand. Domestic and family violence is not a private matter.

Resources

Further information about domestic and family violence is available from White Ribbon Australia (WRA). Included in this information pack are factsheets from White Riboon Australia.

Domestic and Family Violence Information Pack

Myths and reality - White Ribbon Australia

Violence against women and the workplace - White Ribbon Australia

What to do when someone tells you they have experienced violence or abuse - White Ribbon Australia