Our Buildings

Our Buildings
BAC Touchstones
The Arts Centre has been an adaptive reuse and extension of existing buildings to provide a range of flexible spaces. Our Buildings The Arts Centre has been an adaptive reuse and extension of existing buildings to provide a range of flexible spaces.  

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Touchstones. Image courtesy of Jane Cavanough.

Sustainability​

The Bankstown Arts Centre is a living canvas - depicting its evolution from a 1933 municipal swimming pool with associated buildings and grandstand into a traditional arts and crafts centre in 1989 through to its current metamorphosis as a rejuvenated contemporary arts "hub" facility.  The Arts Centre has been an adaptive reuse and extension of existing buildings to provide a range of flexible spaces. It has been designed to optimise the integration of indoor and outdoor spaces, enabling arts activities (performance, exhibitions, festivals etc.) to be conducted outdoors on occasions.

The building has utilised eco-friendly design with ESD principles and includes the used of recycled building materials in floors (Comcork) and timber skirtings (plantation pine), solar panels for energy/hot water, rainwater tanks for detention and reuse, natural ventilation with louvres and limited air conditioning.

Accessibility

Visitors with restricted mobility can utilise all public spaces at Bankstown Arts Centre. Entry to Arts Centre is via the front of the building at Dale Parade. There is a minibus drop off zone at Dale Parade. Disabled parking is also available at the Olympic Parade car park.

Sculptures in the garden

Touchstones

Touchstones is outdoor sculptures created by Jane Cavanough of Artlandish. The Touchstones makes reference to the creativity residing in the Arts Centre, and the jewel-like polished stones created from rocks and minerals by the lapidary craftsmen.

The sculptures are constructed with rust & carved glass and copper.  Each panel of glass was also frosted on its internal face to amplify and diffuse the sun's light by day, and each sculpture was wired with LED lighting to illuminate by night.

Wurrungwuri


Image: Wurrungwuri sculpture at the Arts Centre garden.

Wurrungwuri is a sculpture based on the home of water. It tells the story of how we all need to actively protect and conserve our natural resources. It was made by the Aboriginal Arts Group that meets weekly at Bankstown Arts Centre and facilitated by artist, Diamando Koutsellis.

Wurrungwuri means "this side of the river" in Darug language.